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    Angela Guinther

     

    The End of the Suburbs : Where the American Dream is Moving Gallagher, Leigh (Journalist)
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    The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving

    While I read plenty of fiction I enjoy reading non-fiction as well. To that end, The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving by Fortune managing editor Leigh Gallagher was a must-read for me based on the title alone. Having grown up in a vibrant inner-ring suburb and being a long-time resident of Cleveland, I knew this book would be a bit like preaching to the choir but I read it nonetheless. Indeed, those who enjoy and take advantage of the benefits of city living will find themselves nodding in agreement to parts of this book. But the research goes beyond discussing the merits of access and the demerits of exurban sprawl and studies in-depth the forces at work that will make city living the dominant way of living once again: changes to the nuclear family, people sick and tired of spending an eternity in their cars and in traffic, bland and mediocre suburban design, and the renaissance occurring in cities across America. Gallagher also positively mentions various inner-ring Northeast Ohio suburbs in her well-researched book. Coincidentally, I was also reading The City by Derf, the local comic creator whose strip was the first thing I would read when picking up the Cleveland Edition, Free Times, and, later, the Scene and then The Plain Dealer. (Why is his strip no longer in the PD?) The compilation of his work had several strips regarding life in the city and in the the suburbs--an incredibly synergistic and funny complement to the End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving. If you are still interested in the topic (or want to start small), I recommend an article from the January 2014 issue of Vanity Fair: The Shape of Things to Come by Paul Goldberger. New Year's Reading Resolutions: Check out Brews+Prose, get to CPL's Reader's and Writers Series if I'm not working, and keep a reading log. Happy New Year!

    While I read plenty of fiction I enjoy reading non-fiction as well. To that end, The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving by Fortune managing editor Leigh Gallagher was a must-read for me based on the title alone. Having grown up in a vibrant inner-ring suburb and being a long-time resident of Cleveland, I knew this book would be a bit like preaching to the choir but I read it nonetheless. Indeed, those who enjoy and take advantage of the benefits of city living will find themselves nodding in agreement to parts of this book. But the research goes beyond discussing the merits of access and the demerits of exurban sprawl and studies in-depth the forces at work that will make city living the dominant way of living once again: changes to the nuclear family, people sick and tired of spending an eternity in their cars and in traffic, bland and mediocre suburban design, and the renaissance occurring in cities across America. Gallagher also positively mentions various inner-ring Northeast Ohio suburbs in her well-researched book. Coincidentally, I was also reading The City by Derf, the local comic creator whose strip was the first thing I would read when picking up the Cleveland Edition, Free Times, and, later, the Scene and then The Plain Dealer. (Why is his strip no longer in the PD?) The compilation of his work had several strips regarding life in the city and in the the suburbs--an incredibly synergistic and funny complement to the End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving. If you are still interested in the topic (or want to start small), I recommend an article from the January 2014 issue of Vanity Fair: The Shape of Things to Come by Paul Goldberger.

     

    New Year's Reading Resolutions: Check out Brews+Prose, get to CPL's Reader's and Writers Series if I'm not working, and keep a reading log. Happy New Year!

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    Angela Guinther
    Carnegie West Branch Manager

    Recent Reads: Miss Dreamsville and the Collier County Women's Literary Society by Amy Hill Hearth. The Secret Knowledge: On the Dismantling of American Culture by David Mamet, and Tiny Homes, Simple Shelter: Scaling Back in the Century by Lloyd Kahn
    You might find her: Working out at Edgewater Park and enjoying the lake, or cooking up recipes from some of her favorite cookbooks
    Loves: Concerts, and lots of them. Just this year she saw nearly 10, with Madonna being her favorite of all time.