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    • The road we must travel : a personal guide for your journey
      The road we must travel : a personal guide for your journey
      Francis Chan, Bill Hybels, Eugene Peterson.
      "Highly respected, best-selling spiritual mentors, including Francis Chan, Eugene Peterson (The Message), Bill Hybels, and others, provide guidance as you navigate uncharted roads ahead"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Hidden Tuscany : discovering art, culture, and memories in a well-known region's unknown places
    • The broken road : from the Iron Gates to Mount Athos
    • The Emperor far away : travels at the edge of China
    • The Nile : a journey downriver through Egypt's past and present
      The Nile : a journey downriver through Egypt's past and present
      Toby Wilkinson.
      It was Herodotus who first called Egypt "the gift of the river." Now renowned Egyptologist Toby Wilkinson takes us along the Nile to reveal how it continues to hold the key to understanding the earliest of the great ancient civilizations as well as the volatile and rapidly modernizing country that is Egypt today. Wilkinson's narrative takes us from the river's mystical sources (the Blue Nile which rises in Ethiopia, and the White Nile coursing from majestic Lake Victoria); to Thebes, with its Valley of the Kings, Valley of the Queens, and Luxor Temple; the fertile Delta; Giza, home of the Great Pyramid, the sole surviving Wonder of the Ancient World; and finally, to the pulsating capital city of Cairo, where the Arab Spring erupted on the bridges over the Nile. Along the way, he introduces us to mysterious and fabled characters--the gods and pharaohs, emperors and empresses, who joined their fate to the Nile and gained immortality; the adventurers, archaeologists, and historians who have all fallen under its spell. With matchless erudition and storytelling skill, through both panoramas and close-ups, Wilkinson brings millennia of history into view.--From publisher description.
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    • The Maine woods
      The Maine woods
      Henry David Thoreau
      " Posthumously published in 1864, The Maine Woods depicts Henry David Thoreau's experiences in the forests of Maine, and expands on the author's transcendental theories on the relation of humanity to Nature. On Mount Katahdin, he faces a primal, untamed Nature. Katahdin is a place "not even scarred by man, but it was a specimen of what God saw fit to make this world." In Maine he comes in contact with "rocks, trees, wind and solid earth" as though he were witness to the creation itself. Of equal importance, The Maine Woods depicts Thoreau's contact with the American Indians and depicts his tribal education of learning the language, customs, and mores of the Penobscot people. Thoreau attempts to learn and speak the Abenaki language and becomes fascinated with its direct translation of natural phenomena as in the word sebamook--a river estuary that never loses is water despite having an outlet because it also has an inlet. The Maine Woods illustrates the author's deeper understanding of the complexities of the primal wilderness of uplifted rocky summits in Maine and provides the reader with the pungent aroma of balsam firs, black spruce, mosses, and ferns as only Thoreau could. This new, redesigned edition features an insightful foreword by Thoreau scholar Richard Francis Fleck. Redesigned edition featuring an insightful foreword by Thoreau scholar Richard Francis Fleck. Fleck is a well-respected authority on Thoreau and the author of many books including Henry Thoreau and John Muir Among the Indians. Henry David Thoreau (July 12, 1817 - May 6, 1862) was an American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, historian, and leading transcendentalist. This book was first published in 1864 (composed partly of articles he had written earlier for periodicals) and still in print, is an insightful reporter's picture of a rugged wilderness the moment before being irrevocably altered by armies of loggers. Today the virgin forest seen by Thoreau is gone; trees have been cut, regrown, and harvested again. But modern travelers -- hikers, campers, hunters, fishers, canoeists or back road wanderers -- will still find, as Thoreau did, a land "more grim and wild than you had anticipated." It's also pin-drop tranquil, teeming with wildlife and, in places, challenging to reach. (NYTimes) Following Thoreau into the Maine Woods is hardly a new idea, but it is becoming easier. The Thoreau-Wabanaki Trail was inaugurated, delineating and celebrating Thoreau's passage on routes that Penobscot Indians had used for thousands of years. (NYTimes) Nature tourism is a $37 billion annual industry in the United States (Outdoor Industry Association). "-- Provided by publisher.
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    • French ghosts, Russian nights, and American outlaws : souvenirs of a professional vagabond
    • Glacier National Park : must-do hikes for everyone
    • The Pacific Crest Trail : a hiker's companion
      The Pacific Crest Trail : a hiker's companion
      Karen Berger & Daniel R. Smith.
      For many people, the Pacific Crest Trail is the ultimate long-distance hiking trail. Beginning in the dry valleys of southern California, it follows the crest of the snow-capped Sierras and ends in the ancient forests of Washington's Cascades. Along the way, national treasures such as Yosemite, Crater Lake, and Mount Rainier make this trail one of the premier hiking destinations in the world. But hiking is about much more than getting from A to B. Berger and Smith draw on their tremendous experience--together they have logged more than 12,000 miles on the PCT--to give tested advice to long-distance hikers on trip planning, gear and safety, seasonal considerations, trailheads and resupplies, permits, and much more.
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    • 102 ways to save money for and at Walt Disney World
    • The film lover's New York : legendary addresses that inspired great movies
    • Carsick
      Carsick
      John Waters.
      "John Waters is putting his life on the line. Armed with wit, a pencil-thin mustache, and a cardboard sign that reads 'I'm not psycho,' he hitchhikes across America from Baltimore to San Francisco, braving lonely roads and treacherous drivers. But who should we be more worried about: the delicate film director with genteel manners or the unsuspecting travelers transporting the Pope of Trash?"--Dust jacket flap.
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