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    • Demosthenes of Athens and the fall of classical Greece
      Demosthenes of Athens and the fall of classical Greece
      Ian Worthington.
      Demosthenes (384-322 BC) profoundly shaped one of the most eventful epochs in antiquity. His political career spanned three decades, during which time Greece fell victim to Macedonian control, first under Philip II and then Alexander the Great. Demosthenes' courageous defiance of Macedonian imperialism cost him his life but earned him a reputation as one of history's outstanding patriots. He also enjoyed a brilliant and lucrative career as a speechwriter, and his rhetorical skills are still emulated today by statesmen and politicians. Yet he was a sickly child with a challenging speech impediment, who was swindled out of much of his family's estate by unscrupulous guardians. His story is therefore one of triumph over adversity.
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    • The Oxford anthology of Roman literature
      The Oxford anthology of Roman literature
      edited by Peter E. Knox and J. C. McKeown.

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    • The inspector : a comedy in five acts
      The inspector : a comedy in five acts
      Nikolai Gogol
      "Called "the greatest play written in Russian" by Vladimir Nabokov, Nikolai Gogol's comedy now has a revelatory new translation by renowned American playwright Richard Nelson and Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky, the foremost contemporary translators of classic Russian literature including the best-selling Oprah's Book Club selection, Anna Karenina"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Taboo Pushkin : topics, texts, interpretations
    • The Zhivago affair : the Kremlin, the CIA, and the battle over a forbidden book
      The Zhivago affair : the Kremlin, the CIA, and the battle over a forbidden book
      Peter Finn and Petra Couvee.
      Drawing on newly declassified files, this is the story of how a book forbidden in the Soviet Union became a secret CIA weapon in the ideological battle between East and West. In May 1956, an Italian publishing scout paid a visit to Russia's greatest living poet, Boris Pasternak. He left carrying the manuscript of Pasternak's first and only novel, entrusted to him with these words: "This is Doctor Zhivago. May it make its way around the world." Pasternak believed his novel would never be published in the Soviet Union, where the authorities regarded it as irredeemable--but he thought it stood a chance in the West and, indeed, it was widely published in translation. Then the CIA smuggled a Russian-language edition into the Soviet Union. Copies were sold on the black market and passed surreptitiously from friend to friend, and Pasternak found himself in no small trouble. But his funeral in 1960 was attended by thousands of admirers who defied their government in order to bid him farewell. The example he set launched the great tradition of the Soviet writer-dissident.--From publisher description.
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    • Kissing the sword : a prison memoir
      Kissing the sword : a prison memoir
      Shahrnush Parsipur
      "Shahrnush Parsipur was an important writer and television producer in her native Iran until 1979 when the Islamic Republic began imprisoning its citizens. Kissing the Sword captures the surreal experiences of serving time without being charged with a crime, and witnessing the systematic destruction of any and all opposition to fundamentalist power. It is a memoir filled with both horror and humor: nights blasted by the sounds of machine gun fire as hundreds of prisoners are summarily executed, and days spent debating prison officials on whether the Quran demands that women be covered. Parsipur, one of the great novelists of modern Iran, known for magic realism, tells a story here that is all too real. She mines her own painful memories to create an urgent call for one of the most basic of human rights: freedom of expression. Born in Iran in 1946, Shahrnush Parsipur began her career as a fiction writer and producer at Iranian National Television and Radio. She was imprisoned for nearly five years by the religious government without being formally charged. Shortly after her release, she published Women Without Men and was arrested and jailed again, this time for her frank and defiant portrayal of women's sexuality. While still banned in Iran, the novel became an underground bestseller there, and has been translated into many languages around the world. Parsipur is also the author of Touba and the Meaning of Night, among many other books, and now lives in exile in northern California."-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Lin Shu, Inc. : translation and the making of modern Chinese culture
    • Atmosphere, mood, Stimmung : on a hidden potential of literature
      Atmosphere, mood, Stimmung : on a hidden potential of literature
      Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht
      "What are the various atmospheres or moods that the reading of literary works can trigger? Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht has long argued that the function of literature is not so much to describe, or to re-present, as to make present. Here, he goes one step further, exploring the substance and reality of language as a material component of the world--impalpable hints, tones, and airs that, as much as they may be elusive, are no less matters of actual fact... Conveying personal encounters with poetry, song, painting, and the novel, this book thus gestures toward the intangible and in the process, constitutes a bold defense of the subjective experience of the arts."--page [4] of cover.
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    • Vampires are us : understanding our love affair with the immortal dark side
      Vampires are us : understanding our love affair with the immortal dark side
      Margot Adler.
      ""Vampires. Why do we care? In these pages you will find what is very simply, the most literate, imaginative, and just plain fascinating answer to that question ever written." Whitley Strieber. In a culture that does not do death particularly well, we are obsessed with mortality. Margot Adler writes, "Vampires let us play with death and the issue of mortality. They let us ponder what it would mean to be truly long lived. Would the long view allow us to see the world differently, imagine social structures differently? Would it increase or decrease our reverence for the planet? Vampires allow us to ask questions we usually bury."As Adler, a longtime NPR correspondent and question asker, sat vigil at her dying husband's bedside, she found herself newly drawn to vampire novels and their explorations of mortality. Over the next four years--by now she has read more than 270 vampire novels, from teen to adult, from gothic to modern, from detective to comic--she began to see just how each era creates the vampires it needs. Dracula, an Eastern European monster, was the perfect vehicle for 19th-century England's fear of outsiders and of disease seeping in through its large ports. In 1960s America, Dark Shadows gave us the morally conflicted vampire struggling against his own predatory nature, who still enthralls us today. Think Spike and Angel, Stefan and Damon, Bill and Eric, the Cullens. Vampires Are Us explores the issues of power, politics, morality, identity, and even the fate of the planet that show up in vampire novels today. Perhaps, Adler suggests, our blood is oil, perhaps our prey is the planet. Perhaps vampires are us"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Life coaching for writers : an essential guide to realising your creative potential
      Life coaching for writers : an essential guide to realising your creative potential
      Sarah-Beth Watkins.
      "Self-help and personal development guide for every writer that will help you to unleash your creative potential. Whether you are a fiction or non-fiction writer, it's not always easy to be creative-- life conspires to throw up obstacles, fears, and external influences that get in the way of our writing lives. This book is aimed at writers who know that they want to write but are struggling to realise their full potential. It is specifically aimed at more experienced writers who have had some successes and want to move from the life of an amateur scribbler to a professional writer" -- Page [4] of cover.
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    • The medieval romance of Alexander : Jehan Wauquelin's The deeds and conquests of Alexander the Great
      The medieval romance of Alexander : Jehan Wauquelin's The deeds and conquests of Alexander the Great
      [Jehan Wauquelin]
      The figure of Alexander the Great haunted the medieval imagination - as much as Arthur, as much as Charlemagne. His story was translated more often in medieval Europe than any work except the Gospels. The Deeds and Conquests of Alexander the Great is Jehan Wauquelin's superb compendium, written for the Burgundian court in the mid-fifteenth century, which draws together all the key elements of the Alexandrian tradition. With great clarity and intelligence Wauquelin produced a redaction of all the major Alexander romances of the twelfth, thirteenth and fourteenth centuries - including the verse Roman d'Alexandre, The Vows of the Peacock and La Venjance Alixandre - to tell the whole story of Alexander's miraculous birth and childhood, his conquests of Persia and India, his battles with fabulous beasts and outlandish peoples, his journeys in the sky and under the sea, his poisoning at Babylon and the vengeance taken by his son. This is an accomplished and exciting work by a notable writer at the Burgundian court who perfectly understood the appeal of the great conqueror to ambitious dukes intent upon extending their dominions.
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    • For love or for money : Balzac's rhetorical realism
    • Finding the woman who didn't exist : the curious life of Gisele d'Estoc
      Finding the woman who didn't exist : the curious life of Gisele d'Estoc
      Melanie C. Hawthorne.
      Gisele d'Estoc was the pseudonym of a nineteenth-century French woman writer and, it turns out, artist who, among other things, was accused of being a bomb-planting anarchist, the cross-dressing lover of writer Guy de Maupassant, and the fighter of at least one duel with another woman, inspiring Bayard's famous painting on the subject. The true identity of this enigmatic woman remained unknown and was even considered fictional until recently, when Melanie C. Hawthorne resurrected d'Estoc's discarded story from the annals of forgotten history. Finding the Woman Who Didn't Exist begins with the claim by expert literary historians of France on the eve of World War II that the woman then known only as Gisele d'Estoc was merely a hoax. More than fifty years later, Hawthorne not only proves that she did exist but also uncovers details about her fascinating life and career, along the way adding to our understanding of nineteenth-century France, literary culture, and gender identity. Hawthorne explores the intriguing life of the real d'Estoc, explaining why others came to doubt the "experts" and following the threads of evidence that the latter overlooked. In focusing on how narratives are shaped for particular audiences at particular times, Hawthorne also tells "the story of the story," which reveals how the habits of thought fostered by the humanities continue to matter beyond the halls of academe.
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    • The divine comedy
      The divine comedy
      Dante
      Clive James presents the crowning achievement of his career: a monumental translation of Dante's Divine Comedy. The Divine Comedy is the precursor of modern literature, and Clive James' new translation - his life's work and decades in the making - presents Dante's entire epic poem in a single song. While many poets and translators have attempted to capture the full glory of The Divine Comedy in English, many have fallen short. Victorian verse translations established an unfortunate tradition of reproducing the sprightly rhyming measures of Dante but at the same time betraying the strain on the translator's powers of invention. For Dante, the dramatic human stories of Hell were exciting, but the spiritual studies of Purgatory and the sublime panoramas of Heaven were no less so. In this incantatory new translation, James - defying the convention by writing in quatrains - tackles these problems head-on and creates a striking and hugely accessible translation that gives us The Divine Comedy as a whole, unified, and dramatic work.
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    • Inventing Hell : Dante, the Bible and eternal torment
      Inventing Hell : Dante, the Bible and eternal torment
      Jon M. Sweeney.
      "Hell: The word means terror, darkness, and eternal separation from God. Some people think the Bible is clear about hell, but what if they're mistaken? With gripping narrative and solid scholarship, Sweeney charts hell's "evolution" from the Old Testament underworld Sheol, through history and literature, to the greatest influencer of all: Dante's Inferno. He reveals how the modern idea of hell is based mostly on Dante's imaginative genius-but in the process, he offers a more constructive understanding of the afterlife than ever before. Disturbing and enthralling, Sweeney will forever alter what we think happens to us after we die-and more importantly, he will make us reconsider how we live"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Middleton and Rowley : forms of collaboration in the Jacobean playhouse
      Middleton and Rowley : forms of collaboration in the Jacobean playhouse
      David Nicol.
      "Can the inadvertent clashes between collaborators produce more powerful effects than their concordances? For Thomas Middleton and William Rowley, the playwriting team best known for their tragedy The Changeling, disagreements and friction proved quite beneficial for their work. This first full-length study of Middleton and Rowley uses their plays to propose a new model for the study of collaborative authorship in early modern English drama. David Nicol highlights the diverse forms of collaborative relationships that factor into a play's meaning, including playwrights, actors, companies, playhouses, and patrons. This kaleidoscopic approach, which views the plays from all these perspectives, throws new light on the Middleton-Rowley oeuvre and on early modern dramatic collaboration as a whole."--Pub. desc.
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    • Coriolanus
      Coriolanus
      by William Shakespeare

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    • Johnson and Boswell : a biography of friendship
      Johnson and Boswell : a biography of friendship
      John B. Radner.
      In this book John Radner examines the fluctuating, close, and complex friendship enjoyed by Samuel Johnson and James Boswell, from the day they met in 1763 to the day when Boswell published his monumental "Life of Johnson". Drawing on everything Johnson and Boswell wrote to and about the other, this book charts the psychological currents that flowed between them as they scripted and directed their time together, questioned and advised, confided and held back. It explores the key longings and shifting tensions that distinguished this from each man's other long-term friendships, while it tracks in detail how Johnson and Boswell brought each other to life, challenged and confirmed each other, and used their deepening friendship to define and assess themselves. It tells a story that reaches through its specificity into the dynamics of most sustained friendships, with their breaks and reconnections, their silences and fresh intimacies, their continuities and transformations.
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    • The madwoman and the blindman : Jane Eyre, discourse, disability
      The madwoman and the blindman : Jane Eyre, discourse, disability
      edited by David Bolt, Julia Miele Rodas, and Elizabeth J. Donaldson

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    • The complicity of friends : how George Eliot, G. H. Lewes, and John Hughlings-Jackson encoded Herbert Spencer's secret
    • Radical Larkin : seven types of technical mastery
      Radical Larkin : seven types of technical mastery
      John Osborne, Director of American Studies, University of Hull, UK.

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    • If I were you
      If I were you
      by Alan Ayckbourn.
      "The Rodales seem like an ordinary family, but beneath the surface things are beginning to crack. Jill and Mal have lost the spark in their marriage, their son Sam resents his father and their daughter Chrissie has recently become a mum and is dealing with marriage issues of her own. And while they all share advice on how others should live their lives, nobody is really taking in on board--until Mal and Jill see things from a dramatically different perspective that is. Waking up one morning and finding they have switched personas, Mal in Jill's body and Jill in Mal's, they must continue life "as normal" as their other half. Jill faces the challenges of working with their son-in-law, Dean, as the Store Manager of a homewares shop, while Mal has suddenly become a housewife, learning more about his children and finding out the secrets they already know about him! Will seeing things from the other side make matters even worse, or is this just what they need in order to save their family?"--P. [4] of cover.
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    • The George Lamming reader : the aesthetics of decolonisation
    • Icons of African American literature : the Black literary world
      Icons of African American literature : the Black literary world
      Yolanda Williams Page, editor.
      Provides extensive coverage of some of the most notable figures in African American literature, including Alice Walker, Richard Wright, and Zora Neale Hurston.
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    • The best of McSweeney's
      The best of McSweeney's
      edited by Dave Eggers and Jordan Bass.
      "A comprehensive collection of some of the magazine's most remarkable work."--Back of jacket.
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    • The Norton anthology of African American literature
      The Norton anthology of African American literature
      Henry Louis Gates, Jr., General Editor, Alphonse Fletcher University Professor and Director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and American Research, Harvard University

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    • Red holler : contemporary Appalachian literature
      Red holler : contemporary Appalachian literature
      editors, John E. Branscum, Wayne Thomas.
      A diverse anthology of poetry, fiction, nonfiction, and graphic essays by contemporary Appalachian writers. The editors have assembled a collection spanning ten years and the mountain range from Mississippi to New York, placing fresh new voices alongside widely known and celebrated authors. From Native American myth, African American urban legend, folk culture, and European ghost stories, this is an anthology of disenfranchised, yet robust peoples -- Provided by publisher.
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    • Melville biography : an inside narrative
    • Orbiting Ray Bradbury's Mars : biographical, anthropological, literary, scientific and other perspectives
      Orbiting Ray Bradbury's Mars : biographical, anthropological, literary, scientific and other perspectives
      edited by Gloria McMillan
      "This essay collection explores the life and work of sf doyen Ray Bradbury. Some essays analyze Bradbury's southwest metaphors, some via the lens of post-colonialism or they view Bradbury sociologically, analyzing border issues in his 1947 "I See You Never." From the scientific side, Bradbury forms a significant link between the worlds of fiction and planetary science"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Zane Grey's Wild West : a Study of 31 Novels
      Zane Grey's Wild West : a Study of 31 Novels
      Victor Carl Friesen.
      "This is a literary discussion of one-half of Zane Grey's Westerns, with a chapter for each selected book. The choices show the broad scope of this best-selling author's interests in the West. These novels point out Grey's ecological concern for our natural world"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • The letters of Ernest Hemingway
      The letters of Ernest Hemingway
      edited by Sandra Spanier and Robert W. Trogdon.
      "The first volume encompasses his youth, his experience in World War I, and his arrival in Paris. The letters reveal a more complex person than Hemingway's tough-guy public persona would suggest: devoted son, affectionate brother, infatuated lover, adoring husband, spirited friend, and disciplined writer. Unguarded and never intended for publication, the letters record experiences that inspired his art, afford insight into his creative process, and express his candid assessments of his own work and that of his contemporaries. The letters present immediate accounts of events and relationships that profoundly shaped his life and work. A detailed introduction, notes, chronology, illustrations, and index are included."--from book jacket.
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    • Poems (1962-1997)
    • Idiot psalms : new poems
    • Why torture Is wrong, and the people who love them and other political plays
      Why torture Is wrong, and the people who love them and other political plays
      Christopher Durang.
      The title play tells the story of a young woman who wakes up to find herself in bed with a man she does not know, and to whom she has apparently got married while drunk the previous night. And to make matters worse, it seems like he might be a terrorist.
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    • George Garrett : a critical biography
    • The good counselor
      The good counselor
      by Kathryn Grant.
      A two-act play in which Vincent Heffernan, an African American lawyer, is the public defender for a single Caucasian mother accused of killing her baby. Vincent, hounded by the community and haunted by his past, battles with having to defend both his client and his ailing mother.
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    • The mockingbird next door : life with Harper Lee
      The mockingbird next door : life with Harper Lee
      Marja Mills.
      "One journalist's memoir of her personal friendship with Harper Lee and her sister, drawing on the extraordinary access they gave her to share the story of their lives. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is one of the best loved novels of the twentieth century. But for the last fifty years, the novel's celebrated author, Harper Lee, has said almost nothing on the record. Journalists have trekked to her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama, where Harper Lee, known by her friends as Nelle, has lived with her sister, Alice, for decades, trying and failing to get an interview with the author. But in 2001, the Lee sisters opened their door for Chicago Tribune reporter Marja Mills. It was the beginning of a long conversation-and a friendship that has continued ever since. In 2004, with the Lees' encouragement, Mills moved into the house next door to the sisters. She spent the next eighteen months there, talking and sharing stories over meals and daily drives in the countryside. Along with members of the Lees' tight inner circle, the sisters and Mills would go fishing, feed the ducks, go to the Laundromat, watch the Crimson Tide, drink coffee at McDonald's, and explore all over lower Alabama. Nelle shared her love of history, literature, and the quirky Southern way of life with Mills, as well as her keen sense of how journalism should be practiced. As the sisters decided to let Mills tell their story, Nelle helped make sure she was getting the story-and the South-right. Alice, the keeper of the Lee family history, shared the stories of their family. The Mockingbird Next Door is the story of Mills's friendship with the Lee sisters. It is a testament to the great intelligence, sharp wit, and tremendous storytelling power of these two women, especially that of Nelle. Mills was given a rare opportunity to know Nelle Harper Lee, to be part of the Lees' life in Alabama, and to hear them reflect on their upbringing, their corner of the Deep South, how To Kill a Mockingbird affected their lives, and why Nelle Harper Lee chose to never write another novel"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Dragonwriter : a tribute to Anne McCaffrey and Pern
      Dragonwriter : a tribute to Anne McCaffrey and Pern
      edited by Todd McCaffrey, with Leah Wilson.
      "Science fiction Grand Master Anne McCaffrey and her work, particularly her Dragonriders of Pern series, are beloved by generations of readers. She was one of the first science fiction writers to appear on the New York Times bestseller list, the first woman to win the Hugo and Nebula Awards, and an inductee to the Science Fiction Hall of Fame. Her death in November 2011 was met with an outpouring of grief and memories from those whose lives her stories had touched. Edited by her son Todd, Dragonwriter collects McCaffrey's friends, fans, and professional admirers to remember and pay tribute to the pioneering science fiction author, from the way her love of music and horses influenced her work to her redefinition of the SF genre"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Havana journal
      Havana journal
      by Eduardo Machado.
      "Ruth, a disillusioned writer and radical, leaves the halls of American academia to travel to Cuba. She hopes to find people there who share her beliefs and validate her struggle. It's not until her return to Columbia University that she is confronted by the realities of sacrifice and idealism."--Publisher description.
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    • Adventure of ascent : field notes from a lifelong journey
      Adventure of ascent : field notes from a lifelong journey
      Luci Shaw.
      Autobiographical anecdotes with reflections on aging and a few previously published poems.
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    • The zen of forgetting : poems
    • House of several stories : a tragedy in two acts of nonsense
    • The Irish curse
      The Irish curse
      by Martin Casella.
      A group of professionally successful Irish-American men meet every Wednesday night in a Catholic Church basement as a self-help group for men with small penises, this alleged Irish trait the focus of the weekly sessions. One evening a blue-collar guy joins the group and challenges everything the others think about the Irish curse, and their obsession with body image, unmasking questions of identity, masculinity, sex, and relationships they must face every day.
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    • Luminous other : poems
    • Ground
      Ground
      by Lisa Dillman.

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    • The next monsters
    • Harry Thaw hates everybody
      Harry Thaw hates everybody
      by Laural Meade
      The real-life 1906 murder of New York's architectural eminence Stanford White at the hands of deranged coal baron Harry Thaw is the starting point for this darkly whimsical look at the clash between hedonism and poverty, the emotional toll of excess, and murderous revenge, high-society style.
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    • Twee : the gentle revolution in music, books, television, fashion, and film
      Twee : the gentle revolution in music, books, television, fashion, and film
      Marc Spitz.
      New York Times, Spin, and Vanity Fair contributor Marc Spitz explores the first great cultural movement since Hip Hop: an old-fashioned and yet highly modern aesthetic that's embraced internationally by teens, twenty and thirty-somethings and even some Baby Boomers; creating a hybrid generation known as Twee. Via exclusive interviews and years of research, Spitz traces Generation Twee's roots from the Post War 50s to its dominance in popular culture today.
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    • New poems
      New poems
      [Rainer Maria Rilke]
      "The definitive bilingual version of Rilke's New Poems--faithful to the original German, with insightful commentary on every poem. Rainer Maria Rilke is one of the world's best-selling poets, and New Poems contains many of his most iconic pieces. Throughout, Rilke he is obsessed with shapes and different layers of physical containment--from an image held in a panther's eye to a cathedral window. Translator Joseph Cadora has created the definitive English-language version through meticulous faithfulness to Rilke's German and insightful commentary on each of the four hundred-plus poems. As Cadora said in an interview, 'I tried to stay true to the vision of Rilke that would invite the reader into his world, not mine.'" -- Publisher's description.
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    • Invasion!
      Invasion!
      Jonas Hassen Khemiri

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