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    • The Iliad
      The Iliad
      Homer
      Poet and Homeric scholar Barry B. Powell offers a major new translation of this timeless epic poem.
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    • The Gray Notebook
    • Faces of love : Hafez and the poets of Shiraz
      Faces of love : Hafez and the poets of Shiraz
      introduced and translated by Dick Davis.
      "A giant of world literature, an eloquent princess, a dissolute satirist {u2013} these are the three voices translated from fourteenth-century Persian by Dick Davis in Faces of Love. Together, they represent one of the most remarkable literary flowerings of any era. All three {u2013} Hafez, Jahan Malek Khatun, and Obayd-e Zakani {u2013} lived in Shiraz, a provincial capital in south-central Iran, and all drew support from arts-loving rulers at a time better known for invasions and political violence. Love was a frequent subject of their work: spiritual as well as secular, in varieties embracing every aspect of the human heart."--The publisher's website.
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    • DERANGEMENTS OF MY CONTEMPORARIES: MISCELLANEOUS NOTES
    • Musings on mortality : from Tolstoy to Primo Levi
      Musings on mortality : from Tolstoy to Primo Levi
      Victor Brombert.
      "'All art and the love of art,' Victor Brombert writes at the beginning of the deeply personal Musings on Mortality, 'allow us to negate our nothingness.' As a young man returning from World War II, Brombert came to understand this truth as he immersed himself in literature. Death can be found everywhere in literature, he saw, but literature itself is on the side of life. With delicacy and penetrating insight, Brombert traces the theme of mortality in the work of a group of authors who wrote during the past century and a half, teasing out and comparing their views of death as they emerged from vastly different cultural contexts. Leo Tolstoy, Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Virginia Woolf, Albert Camus, Giorgio Bassani, J. M. Coetzee, and Primo Levi--these are the writers whose works Brombert plumbs, illuminating their views on the meaning of life and the human condition. But there is more to their work, he shows, than a pervasive interest in mortality: they wrote not only of physical death but also of the threat of moral and spiritual death--and as the twentieth century progressed, they increasingly reflected on the traumatic events of their times and the growing sense of a collective historical tragedy. He probes the individual struggle with death, for example, through Tolstoy's Ivan Ilych and Mann's Aschenbach, while he explores the destruction of whole civilizations in Bassani, Camus, and Primo Levi. For Kafka and Woolf, writing seems to hold the promise of salvation, though that promise is seen as ambiguous and even deceptive, while Coetzee, writing about violence and apartheid South Africa, is deeply concerned with a sense of disgrace. Throughout the book, Brombert roots these writers' reflections in philosophical meditations on mortality. Ultimately, he reveals that by understanding how these authors wrote about mortality, we can grasp the full scope of their literary achievement and vision. Drawing deeply from the well of Brombert's own experience, Musings on Mortality is more than mere literary criticism: it is a moving and elegant book for all to learn and live by." -- Publisher's description.
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    • Writing the story within : becoming the writer you came here to be!
    • Writer for hire : 101 secrets to freelance success
      Writer for hire : 101 secrets to freelance success
      Kelly James-Enger.
      Overview: There's no shortage of books on crafting book proposals, writing novels, overcoming writer's block, and getting in touch with one's muse. But what about a book for writers who simply want to earn a regular paycheck? Writer for Hire is just the wisdom full- and part-time freelancers' need. Author Kelly James-Enger details: 101 secrets to success, organized into five overarching strategies. You'll be able to implement what you learn immediately. Invaluable advice on managing deadlines, querying effectively, working with clients, handling taxes, invoices, and more. Strategies for getting more writing gigs, including networking (in-person and online), establishing yourself as an expert, working more efficiently under tight deadlines, and handling rejection with confidence. James-Enger looks at the "whole freelancer," addressing both the craft and business of freelancing.
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    • How to read a novelist
      How to read a novelist
      John Freeman.
      National book critic John Freeman pulls together his very best profiles (many of them new or completely rewritten for this volume) of the very best novelists of our time, including such international stars as Doris Lessing, Haruki Murakami, Salman Rushdie, and Mo Yan, to established American lions such as Don DeLillo, Norman Mailer, Toni Morrison, Marilynne Robinson, Philip Roth, John Updike, and David Foster Wallace, to the new guard of Edwidge Danticat, Dave Eggers, Jonathan Franzen, and more.
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    • The organized teacher's guide to children's literature
    • Shakespeare's Montaigne : the Florio translation of the essays
      Shakespeare's Montaigne : the Florio translation of the essays
      Michel de Montaigne
      "An NYRB Classics Original Shakespeare, Nietzsche once wrote, was Montaigne's best reader. It is a typically brilliant Nietzschean insight, capturing the intimate relationship between the ever-changing record of the mutable self constituted by Montaigne's Essays and Shakespeare's kaleidoscopic register of human character. For all that, how much Shakespeare actually read Montaigne remains a matter of uncertainty and debate to this day. That he read him there is no doubt. Passages from Montaigne are evidently reworked in both King Lear and The Tempest, and there are possible echoes elsewhere in the plays. But however closely Shakespeare himself may have pored over the Essays, he lived in a milieu in which Montaigne was widely known, oft cited, and both disputed and respected. This in turn was thanks to the inspired and dazzling translation of his work by a man who was a fascinating polymath, man-about-town, and master of language himself, John Florio. Shakespeare's Montaigne offers modern readers a new, adroitly modernized edition of Florio's translation of the Essays, a still-resonant reading of Montaigne that is also a masterpiece of English prose. Florio's translation, like Sir Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy and the works of Sir Thomas Browne, is notable not only for its stylistic range and felicity and the deep and lingering music of many passages, but also for having helped to invent the English language as we know it today, supplying it, very much as Shakespeare also did, with new words and enduring turns of phrase. Stephen Greenblatt's introduction also explores the echoes and significant tensions between Shakespeare's and Montaigne's world visions, while Peter Platt introduces readers to the life and times of John Florio. Altogether, this book provides a remarkable new experience of not just two but three great writers who ushered in the modern world"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • 100 love sonnets
    • Twenty-first century perspectives on Victorian literature
    • James Joyce
      James Joyce
      editor, Albert Wachtel.

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    • Girls like that
    • FAILURE TO THRIVE
    • The lake's apprentice
    • The American dream
      The American dream
      editor, Keith Newlin, University of North Carolina, Wilmington.
      "Deconstruction of the promise of prosperity and success--and often subsequent disillusionment--associated with the American Dream and Experience "The American Dream" is a phrase that has become an essential component of the American experience, a phrase that, once entered into the national lexicon, has come to define our nation's identity, underlying nearly every aspect of our lives. And since the birth of the founding document of our nation, the Declaration of Independence, the idea of "the American Dream" has become a pervasive and frequently deconstructed theme within the canon of American literature. Edited by Keith Newlin, Professor of English at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, Critical Insights: The American Dream offers thirteen original essays exploring the contexts and expressions of the dream as it is reflected in our imaginative literature. For readers who are studying it for the first time, four essays survey the critical conversation regarding the theme, explore its cultural and historical contexts, and offer close and comparative readings of key texts in the genre. Readers seeking a deeper understanding of the theme can then move on to other essays that explore it in depth through a variety of critical approaches. Works discussed include The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin, Death of a Salesman, The Great Gatsby, Bernard Malamud's The Assistant, Americo Paredes's George Washington Gomez, and Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, as well as the works of Willa Cather, Cormac McCarthy, Theodore Dreiser, and Michael Gold, among others."--Publisher's website.
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    • American road literature
      American road literature
      editor, Ronald Primeau, Central Michigan University.
      "An exploration of "cruising" America, Highways through the Heartland: American Road Literature examines the prominent themes and stories of the American road narrative. Beginning with the westward thrust of early America's seaboard colonies to the romanticized and philosophical road narratives of the Beat Generation, the American experience--its ideals, dreams, and subsequent disillusionments--has been quintessentially linked to the road. Whether grueling or carefree, spiritual or physical, these journeys upon the American highway have helped us to explore and define our diverse culture and establish the road narrative as an essential American genre. Edited by Ron Primeau, Professor of English at Central Michigan University, this volume in the Critical Insights series presents a variety of new essays on the genre. For readers who are studying it for the first time, four essays survey the critical conversation regarding the American road narrative, explore its cultural and historical contexts, and offer close and comparative readings of key texts in the genre. Readers seeking a deeper understanding of American road literature can then move on to other essays that explore it in depth through a variety of critical approaches. Works discussed include Theodore Dreiser's A Hoosier Holiday, Jack Kerouac's On the Road, Sinclair Lewis' Free Air, and N. Scott Momaday's The Way to Rainy Mountain, as well as the works of Mark Twain, Wright Morris, Cormac McCarthy, Stephen King, and Theodore Roethke."--Publisher's website.
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    • Pulp fiction of the 1920s and 1930s
      Pulp fiction of the 1920s and 1930s
      editor, Gary Hoppenstand, Michigan State University.

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    • Literature of protest
      Literature of protest
      editor, Kimberly Drake, Scripps College.
      "A survey of fiction that examines society and politics from the margins, often with radical and alternative views of the world. The literature of protest is defined as fiction and poetry that emerges from minority social positions and will critique majority status quo conditions. This literature covers a wide range of periods and will emerge from a variety of international authors and events, from American abolitionist narratives to the critique of the totalitarianism in 1920s Soviet politics. Rounding out the volume are a list of literary works not mentioned in the book that concern the theme as well as a bibliography of critical sources for readers seeking to study this timeless theme in greater depth."--Publisher's website.
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    • Melville : fashioning in modernity
      Melville : fashioning in modernity
      Stephen Matterson.
      "Melville: Fashioning in Modernity considers all of the major fiction with a concentration on lesser-known work, and provides a radically fresh approach to Melville, focusing on: clothing as socially symbolic; dress, power and class; the transgressive nature of dress; inappropriate clothing; the meaning of uniform; the multiplicity of identity that dress may represent; anxiety and modernity. The representation of clothing in the fiction is central to some of Melville's major themes; the relation between private and public identity, social inequality and how this is maintained; the relation between power, justice and authority; the relation between the "civilized" and the "savage." Frequently clothing represents the malleability of identity (its possibilities as well as its limitations), represents writing itself, as well as becoming indicative of the crisis of modernity. Clothing also becomes a trope for Melville's representations of authorship and of his own scene of writing. Melville: Fashioning in Modernity also encompasses identity in transition, making use of the examination of modernity by theorists such as Anthony Giddens, as well as on theories of figures such as the dandy. In contextualizing Melville's interest in clothing, a variety of other works and writers is considered; works such as Robinson Crusoe and The Scarlet Letter, and novelists such as Fenimore Cooper, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry James, Jack London, and George Orwell. The book has at its core a consideration of the scene of writing and the publishing history of each text"-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Melville and the idea of blackness : race and imperialism in nineteenth-century America
    • Dreadful : the short life and gay times of John Horne Burns
      Dreadful : the short life and gay times of John Horne Burns
      David Margolick.
      Born in Massachusetts in 1916, John Horne Burns grew up steeped in the traditions of New England and alienated from them--a defiant Irish Catholic amid staid Yankees. After Andover and Harvard he taught English at the Loomis School in Windsor, Connecticut, one of the few prestigious prep schools that would hire a Catholic at the time. Burns stood out there as a precocious young man with enormous intellectual and musical gifts, a wicked sense of humor, an ability to inspire selected students (and infuriate colleagues), and boundless literary ambition. He was also--though it could barely be acknowledged in that time and place--gay. During World War II, Burns was stationed in North Africa and Italy, and from this experience he wrote his groundbreaking debut novel set in Naples, The Gallery (1947). It was not only one of the first novels to address gay life within the American military, but also to depict homosexuals openly and sympathetically. It presented an unvarnished look at GIs as occupiers of a foreign land, a perspective vastly different from subsequent portraits of a "greatest generation." Critics instantly labeled Burns one of the most promising literary voices of his generation. But, unprepared for fame and notoriety, struggling to contain a cynicism and bitterness stemming in part from his own nature, and in part from being gay in a homophobic time, Burns could never match his promise. Instead, in self-imposed exile in Italy, he descended into alcoholism and depression until his premature death in 1953. -- Jacket.
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    • William Faulkner
      William Faulkner
      editor, Kathryn Stelmach Artuso, Westmont College.

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    • Zora Neale Hurston
      Zora Neale Hurston
      editor, Sharon L. Jones, Wright State University.

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    • Mirages : the unexpurgated diary of Anais Nin 1939-1947
      Mirages : the unexpurgated diary of Anais Nin 1939-1947
      [Anais Nin] edited by Paul Herron
      Mirages collects, for the first time, the story that was cut from all of Nin's other published diaries, particularly volumes 3 and 4 of The Diary of Anais Nin, which cover the same time period. It is the long-awaited successor to the previous unexpurgated diaries Henry and June, Incest, Fire, and Nearer the Moon. Mirages answers the questions Nin readers have been asking for decades: What led to the demise of Nin's love affair with Henry Miller? Just how troubled was her marriage to Hugh Guiler? What is the story behind Nin's "children," the effeminate young men she seemed to collect at will? Mirages is a deeply personal story of heartbreak, despair, desperation, carnage, and deep mourning, but it is also one of courage, persistence, evolution, and redemption that reaches beyond the personal to the universal.
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    • Raymond Carver
      Raymond Carver
      editor, James Plath, Illinois Wesleyan University.

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    • Friedman's fables
      Friedman's fables
      Edwin H. Friedman.
      Contains twenty-four stories of animals designed to provide insights and perspectives on familiar human behaviors.
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    • It's all a kind of magic : the young Ken Kesey
      It's all a kind of magic : the young Ken Kesey
      Rick Dodgson.
      "The first biography of Kesey, [revealing] a youthful life of brilliance and eccentricity that encompassed wrestling, writing, farming, magic and ventriloquism, CIA-funded experiments with hallucinatory drugs, and a notable cast of characters that would come to include Wallace Stegner, Larry McMurtry, Tom Wolfe, Neal Cassady, Timothy Leary, the Grateful Dead, and Hunter S. Thompson"--Dust jacket flap.
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    • The Biscuit Joint : poems
    • Sylvia Plath
      Sylvia Plath
      editor, William K. Buckley, Indiana University Northwest.

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    • A collection of comfort & encouragement
      A collection of comfort & encouragement
      Helen Steiner Rice.
      "Beloved poet Helen Steiner Rice's beautiful verse has been treasured for decades. And her work will continue to inspire you as you experience the heavenly Father's faithfulness in this encouraging collection. You'll be moved to share Helen Steiner Rice's uplifting verse again and again with A Collection Comfort and Encouragement"--Amazon.com.
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    • Philip Roth
      Philip Roth
      editor, Aimee Pozorski.
      "Philip Roth's many honors testify to his importance. He won awards for many of his individual novels, including two National Book Awards (for 1959's Goodbye, Columbus and 1995's Sabbath's Theater), two National Book Critics Circle Awards (for The Counterlife, and 1991's Patrimony), three PEN/Faulkner awards (for 1993's Operation Shylock, The Human Stain, and 2006's Everyman), and a Pulitzer Prize (for American Pastoral). He also won awards for the body of his work, including an award for Jewish Cultural Achievement in the Arts (1993), the gold medal for fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters (2001), the National Book Foundation award for distinguished contribution to American letters (2002), the PEN/Nabokov award for lifetime achievement (2006), and the PEN/Bellow award for Achievement in American Fiction (2007). In 2005, he became the third living author to have his works included in the Library of America. Edited by Aimee Pozorski, Associate Professor of English at Central Connecticut State University and President of the Philip Roth Society, this volume in the Critical Insights series presents a variety of new essays on the Jewish-American writer, who stunned the literary world by announcing his retirement in November of 2012. For readers who are studying Roth for the first time, a biographical sketch relates the details of his life and four essays survey the critical reception of Roth's work, explore its cultural and historical contexts, situate Roth among his contemporaries, and review key themes in his work. Readers seeking a deeper understanding of the writer can then move on to other original essays that explore a bevy of topics, such as major thematic trajectories in Roth's work, the author's use of autobiographical gestures, the mechanics of history in his works, and the author's style in his later writings and books. Works discussed include The Professor of Desire, The Plot Against America, The Ghost Writer, the Nemesis tetralogy, and Roth's American trilogy (American Pastoral, I Married a Communist, and The Human Stain). Among the contributors are Victoria Aarons, Naomi Desrochers, Derek Parker Royal, and Debra Shostak. Rounding out the volume are a chronology of Roth's life and a list of his principal publications as well as a bibliography for readers seeking to study this fascinating author in greater depth. Each essay is 2,500 to 5,000 words in length, and all essays conclude with a list of "Works Cited," along with endnotes. Finally, the volume's appendixes offer a section of useful reference resources: A chronology of the author's life ; A complete list of the author's works and their original dates of publication ; A general bibliography ; A detailed paragraph on the volume's editor ; Notes on the individual chapter authors ; A subject index."--Publisher's website.
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    • Kurt Vonnegut
      Kurt Vonnegut
      editor, Robert T. Tally Jr., Texas State University.
      "Critical acclaim eluded Kurt Vonnegut until Slaughterhouse-Five was published in 1969. An immediate best seller, it earned for the author respect from critics who had previously dismissed him as a mediocre science-fiction writer. Over the course of his career, Vonnegut was honored as the Briggs-Copeland Lecturer at Harvard University, as a member of the National Institute of Arts and Letters, and as the Distinguished Professor of English Prose at the City University of New York. Through his insightful and sympathetic treatment of the psychologically and morally crippled victims of the modern world, Vonnegut earned a reputation as one of the greatest humanist writers of his time. Edited by Robert T. Tally Jr., an assistant professor of English at Texas State University and Vice President of The Kurt Vonnegut Society, this volume in the Critical Insights series presents a variety of new essays on the popular late-twentieth-century American novelist. For readers who are studying Vonnegut for the first time, a biographical sketch relates the details of his life and four essays survey the critical reception of his work, explore its cultural and historical contexts, situate Vonnegut among his contemporaries, and review key themes in his work. Readers seeking a deeper understanding of the writer can then move on to other original essays that explore a bevy of topics, such as major thematic trajectories in Vonnegut's work, the significance of metafiction in Vonnegut's works, Vonnegut's relationship with conventional Christianity, and Vonnegut's use of generic conventions. Works discussed include Slaughterhouse-Five, Breakfast of Champions, Hocus Pocus, Cat's Cradle, and The Sirens of Titan."--Publisher's website.
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    • Adventures of Pi : poems 1980-1990
    • Split
      Split
      Cathy Linh Che.
      ""Split crosses borders, exposing truths and dreams, violations of body and mind, aligning them until the deep push-pull of silence and song become a bridge. And here we cross over into a landscape where beauty interrogates, and we encounter a voice that refuses to let us off the hook."-Yusef KomunyakaaIn this stunning debut, we follow one woman's profoundly personal account of sexual violence against the backdrop of cultural conflict deftly illustrated through her parents' experiences of the Vietnam War, immigration, and its aftermath. By looking closely at landscape and psyche, Split explores what happens when deep trauma occurs and seeks to understand what it means to finally become whole.From "The German word for dream is traume.":When my mother whispered, Has anyone touched you there? I had to pick.Alan, I said.I was seven. The training wheels were coming off.Between the couch and wall, the ceiling was white with popcorn bits. The boys stoodand watched. I lay there, my eyes open like a doll's. Someone said, Let me try.He rode on top then abruptly stopped. The boys laughed,and then, they stood me up.Cathy Linh Che is a poet from Los Angeles, California. She has received scholarships and fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center at Provincetown, Hedgebrook, Kundiman, Poets & Writers, Inc., and Poets House. She is currently co-editor of an anthology called Inheriting the War and a founding editor of Paperbag. She lives and teaches in Brooklyn, New York. "-- Provided by publisher.
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    • Holy island
    • Etruria
      Etruria
      Rodney Koeneke.

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    • I knead my mommy : and other poems by kittens
      I knead my mommy : and other poems by kittens
      by Franceso Marciuliano.
      A book of confessional poems about the triumphs, trials, and daily discoveries of being a kitten. This volume gives readers a glimpse into kittens' confused and curious feline minds as they encounter the world around them.
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    • Hymn for the black terrific : poems
    • Interrobang : poems
    • Seas to mulberries : poetry
      Seas to mulberries : poetry
      by Frank Watson
      In a journey across the landscapes of time and place, between the changes in life like the evolution of sand and sea, Watson's poetry tells of the human heart through tiny stories and images that linger in the mind as a meditation of the soul.
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