Search in:
    Find:

    History - United States

     

    • Great Basin Indians : an encyclopedic history
    • A different medicine : postcolonial healing in the Native American Church
    • Iroquois : people of the longhouse
      Iroquois : people of the longhouse
      Michael G. Johnson.
      Looks at the people of the Iroquois Confederacy--the Mohawk, Oneida, Cayuga, Onondaga, Seneca, and--admitted into the Iroquois as a sixth nation by 1722--the Tuscarora. "Iroquois: People of the Longhouse" details their story up to the present day, when perhaps 50,000 people of Iroquois descent still live on, or near, their reserves in Canada and the U.S., with that many again living in cities. The volume also contains an Iroquois gazetteer, bibliography, and a list of Iroquois reserves and reservations and their populations.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Encounters at the heart of the world : a history of the Mandan people
      Encounters at the heart of the world : a history of the Mandan people
      Elizabeth A. Fenn.
      "A book that radically changes our understanding of North America before and after the arrival of Europeans Encounters at the Heart of the World concerns the Mandan Indians, iconic Plains people whose teeming, busy towns on the upper Missouri River were for centuries at the center of the North American universe. We know of them mostly because Lewis and Clark spent the winter of 1804-1805 with them, but why don't we know more? Who were they really? In this extraordinary book, Elizabeth A. Fenn retrieves their history by piecing together important new discoveries in archaeology, anthropology, geology, climatology, epidemiology, and nutritional science. Her boldly original interpretation of these diverse research findings offers us a new perspective on early American history, a new interpretation of the American past. By 1500, more than twelve thousand Mandans were established on the northern Plains, and their commercial prowess, agricultural skills, and reputation for hospitality became famous. Recent archaeological discoveries show how they thrived, and then how they collapsed. The damage wrought by imported diseases like smallpox and the havoc caused by the arrival of horses and steamboats were tragic for the Mandans, yet, as Fenn makes clear, their sense of themselves as a people with distinctive traditions endured. A riveting account of Mandan history, landscapes, and people, Fenn's narrative is enriched and enlivened not only by science and research but by her own encounters at the heart of the world"-- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Connected : how trains, genes, pineapples, piano keys, and a few disasters transformed Americans at the dawn of the Twentieth Century
    • What changed when everything changed : 9/11 and the making of national identity
      What changed when everything changed : 9/11 and the making of national identity
      Joseph Margulies.
      In this startling analysis of the direction of America's political conversation since the events of September 11, 2001, Joseph Margulies traces the evolution of American identity. He shows that for key elements of the post-9/11 landscape--especially support for counterterror policies like torture and hostility to Islam--American identity is not only darker than it was before September 11, but substantially more repressive than it was immediately after the attacks. Even more surprising, this appetite for repressive policies has developed while the terrorist threat has declined. As the counsel of record in 2004 for the first Supreme Court case regarding detentions at Guantanamo Bay, and later the counsel of record for the first and only Supreme Court cases involving overseas detention of U. S. citizens in the war on terror, Margulies has direct real-life experience with these changes in values. He shows that in the immediate aftermath of 9/11 there was a shared determination to preserve national identity. But since then the national narrative has unexpectedly veered off course, becoming far more repressive and alarmist as the threat has abated. Margulies argues persuasively that beneath our common language about shared ideals, American values are surprisingly fluid, and he warns, "National identity is not fixed, it is made."
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Hunting the president : threats, plots, and assassination attempts-- from FDR to Obama
    • Presidents and the dissolution of the Union : leadership style from Polk to Lincoln
      Presidents and the dissolution of the Union : leadership style from Polk to Lincoln
      Fred I. Greenstein with Dale Anderson.
      "The United States witnessed an unprecedented failure of its political system in the mid-nineteenth century, resulting in a disastrous civil war that claimed the lives of an estimated 750,000 Americans. In his other acclaimed books about the American presidency, Fred Greenstein assesses the personal strengths and weaknesses of presidents from George Washington to Barack Obama. Here, he evaluates the leadership styles of the Civil War-era presidents. Using his trademark no-nonsense approach, Greenstein looks at the presidential qualities of James K. Polk, Zachary Taylor, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce, James Buchanan, and Abraham Lincoln. For each president, he provides a concise history of the man's life and presidency, and evaluates him in the areas of public communication, organizational capacity, political skill, policy vision, cognitive style, and emotional intelligence. Greenstein sheds light on why Buchanan is justly ranked as perhaps the worst president in the nation's history, how Pierce helped set the stage for the collapse of the Union and the bloodiest war America had ever experienced, and why Lincoln is still considered the consummate American leader to this day.Presidents and the Dissolution of the Union reveals what enabled some of these presidents, like Lincoln and Polk, to meet the challenges of their times--and what caused others to fail"-- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Racism without racists : color-blind racism and the persistence of racial inequality in America
    • Seeing race in modern America
      Seeing race in modern America
      Matthew Pratt Guterl.
      In this book, the author focuses on how and why we come to see race in very particular ways. What does it mean to see someone as a color? As racially mixed or ethnically ambiguous? What history makes such things possible? Drawing creatively from advertisements, YouTube videos, and everything in between, he redirects our understanding of racial sight away from the dominant categories of color, away from brown and yellow and black and white, and instead insists that we confront the visual practices that make those same categories seem so irrefutably important. Zooming out for the bigger picture, he illuminates the long history of the practice of seeing, and believing in race, and reveals that our troublesome faith in the details discerned by the discriminating glance is widespread and very popular. In so doing, he upends the possibility of a postracial society by revealing how deeply race is embedded in our culture, with implications that are often matters of life and death. -- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Islamophobia in America : the anatomy of intolerance
      Islamophobia in America : the anatomy of intolerance
      edited by Carl W. Ernst.
      "Islamophobia is the name given to the virulent anti-Islamic prejudice that has been hyped by the news media and seized upon by cynical politicians. Five essays by six specialists on Islam in America provide important insights into Islamophobia as a conflict over American identity during a time of crisis. The authors clarify the way that differences of religion, race, and gender have been used to portray Muslims as threatening "out-groups," just as other minorities (Catholics, Jews, blacks) have been attacked in the past. The result is a valuable and thought-provoking analysis of the tactics for denying full citizenship to a minority religious group."--Publisher's website.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • NAACP youth and the fight for black freedom, 1936-1965
    • From every mountainside : black churches and the broad terrain of civil rights
      From every mountainside : black churches and the broad terrain of civil rights
      edited by R. Drew Smith.
      "It has become popular to confine discussion of the American civil rights movement to the mid-twentieth-century South. From Every Mountainside contains essays that refuse to bracket the quest for civil rights in this manner, treating the subject as an enduring topic yet to be worked out in American politics and society. Individual essays point to the multiple directions the quest for civil rights has taken, into the North and West, and into policy areas left unresolved since the end of the 1960s, including immigrant and gay rights, health care for the uninsured, and the persistent denials of black voting rights and school equality. In exploring these issues, the volume's contributors shed light on distinctive regional dimensions of African American political and church life that bear in significant ways on both the mobilization of civil rights activism and the achievement of its goals."--p. [4] of cover.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • The seeking
      The seeking
      Will Thomas
      A man describes his purchase of a house in Northern Vermont, and his gradual realization that Vermonters live up to their idea that no one person is better than another.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Washington's spies : the story of America's first spy ring
      Washington's spies : the story of America's first spy ring
      Alexander Rose.
      In 1778, George Washington unleashed an unlikely ring of spies in New York to discover British battle plans.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Government by dissent : protest, resistance, and radical democratic thought in the early American republic
      Government by dissent : protest, resistance, and radical democratic thought in the early American republic
      Robert W.T. Martin.
      "Democracy is the rule of the people. But what exactly does it mean for a people to rule? Which practices and behaviors are legitimate, and which are democratically suspect? We generally think of democracy as government by consent; a government of, by, and for the people. This has been true from Locke through Lincoln to the present day. Yet in understandably stressing the importance--indeed, the monumental achievement--of popular consent, we commonly downplay or even denigrate the role of dissent in democratic governments. But in Government by Dissent, Robert W.T. Martin explores the idea that the people most important in a flourishing democracy are those who challenge the status quo. The American political radicals of the 1790s understood, articulated, and defended the crucial necessity of dissent to democracy. By returning to their struggles, successes, and setbacks, and analyzing their imaginative arguments, Martin recovers a more robust approach to popular politics, one centered on the ever-present need to challenge the status quo and the powerful institutions that both support it and profit from it. Dissent has rarely been the mainstream of democratic politics. But the figures explored here--forgotten farmers as well as revered framers--understood that dissent is always the essential undercurrent of democracy and is often the critical crosscurrent. Only by returning to their political insights can we hope to reinvigorate our own popular politics." -- Publisher's description.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Emperor of liberty : Thomas Jefferson's foreign policy
    • Servants of Allah : African Muslims enslaved in the Americas
    • Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American slave
      Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American slave
      Frederick Douglass
      "An updated edition of a classic African American autobiography, with new supplementary materials. The preeminent American slave narrative first published in 1845, Frederick Douglass's Narrative powerfully details the life of the abolitionist from his birth into slavery in 1818 to his escape to the North in 1838, how he endured the daily physical and spiritual brutalities of his owners and driver, how he learned to read and write, and how he grew into a man who could only live free or die. In addition to Douglass's classic autobiography, this new edition also includes his most famous speech "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" and his only known work of fiction, The Heroic Slave, which was written, in part, as a response to Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin"-- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Abraham Lincoln : political writings and speeches
      Abraham Lincoln : political writings and speeches
      edited by Terence Ball.
      Abraham Lincoln occupies a unique place in the American pantheon. Symbol, sage, myth and martyr, he is an American icon - Honest Abe and The Great Emancipator, a Janus-faced demigod sculpted in marble. But this is the post-assassination Lincoln. During his lifetime Lincoln elicited very different reactions. The writings and speeches presented in this scholarly edition illuminate Lincoln as a political thinker in the context of his own time and political situation. Opening with a concise yet rich introduction, the texts that follow are complete and carefully edited, with extensive annotation and footnotes to provide a clearer insight into Lincoln the man, the politician and political thinker. His views on race and slavery, on secession and civil war and on the contradiction (as his saw it) between the Declaration of Independence ('all men are created equal') and the original Constitution (which condones slavery) are laid out in Lincoln's own well-crafted words.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • The Civil War : the final year told by those who lived it
      The Civil War : the final year told by those who lived it
      Aaron Sheehan-Dean, editor.
      " ... [Draws from] letters, diary entries, speeches, articles, messages and poems to provide an incomparable literary portrait of a nation at war with itself, while illuminating the military and political events that brought the Union to final victory and slavery and secession to their ultimate destruction ..."--Dust jacket flap.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • The handy Civil War answer book
    • American Civil War guerrillas : changing the rules of warfare
      American Civil War guerrillas : changing the rules of warfare
      Daniel E. Sutherland.
      "Focusing on a little-known yet critical aspect of the American Civil War, this must-read history illustrates how guerrilla warfare shaped the course of the war and, to a surprisingly large extent, determined its outcome"-- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • The greatest speech, ever : the remarkable story of Abraham Lincoln and his Gettysburg Address
      The greatest speech, ever : the remarkable story of Abraham Lincoln and his Gettysburg Address
      by James L. Cotton Jr.
      "Not only a scholarly assessment of the Gettysburg Address and its impact on America, but also an absorbing look into Abraham Lincoln's life."--Publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • The most dangerous man in America : the making of Douglas MacArthur
    • Footprints in New York : tracing the lives of four centuries of New Yorkers
    • I never knew that about New York
    • Summer in the city : John Lindsay, New York, and the American dream
    • Inside the White House : Stories from the World's Most Famous Residence
      Inside the White House : Stories from the World's Most Famous Residence
      Noel Grove, with William B. Bushong and Joel D. Treese
      In collaboration with the White House Historical Association, National Geographic presents this authoritative overview of Americas first home featuring never before published stories and photographs. Organized by theme, discover what makes the White House tick -from its beginnings to the modern day, from the architecture, to the staff, to the first families. Learn fascinating details of the real life Downton Abbey staff who run this grand home. Marvel at the elaborate detail that goes into hosting a state dinner. Meet the beloved pets who've inhabited 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue. Read about celebrity visitors, the media, and the security so critical in todays world. Sidebars contain tidbits of rare information, and an appendix includes an illustrated time line of all White House First Families as well as a complete index. Photos include intimate and candid glimpses of life inside the White House -some never before seen, others long forgotten, and most never displayed in such large format.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Atlanta, cradle of the New South : race and remembering in the Civil War's aftermath
    • Louisiana : crossroads of the Atlantic world
    • The girls of Atomic City [text (large print)] : the untold story of the women who helped win World War II
      The girls of Atomic City [text (large print)] : the untold story of the women who helped win World War II
      Denise Kiernan.
      In this book the author traces the story of the unsung World War II workers in Oak Ridge, Tennessee through interviews with dozens of surviving women and other Oak Ridge residents. This is the story of the young women of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, who unwittingly played a crucial role in one of the most significant moments in U.S. history. The Tennessee town of Oak Ridge was created from scratch in 1942. One of the Manhattan Project's secret cities, it did not appear on any maps until 1949, and yet at the height of World War II it was using more electricity than New York City and was home to more than 75,000 people, many of them young women recruited from small towns across the South. Their jobs were shrouded in mystery, but they were buoyed by a sense of shared purpose, close friendships, and a surplus of handsome scientists and Army men. But against this wartime backdrop, a darker story was unfolding. The penalty for talking about their work, even the most innocuous details, was job loss and eviction. One woman was recruited to spy on her coworkers. They all knew something big was happening at Oak Ridge, but few could piece together the true nature of their work until the bomb "Little Boy" was dropped over Hiroshima, Japan, and the secret was out. The shocking revelation: the residents of Oak Ridge were enriching uranium for the atomic bomb. Though the young women originally believed they would leave Oak Ridge after the war, many met husbands there, made lifelong friends, and still call the seventy-year-old town home. The reverberations from their work there, work they did not fully understand at the time, are still being felt today.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Cleveland calamities : a history of storm, fire and pestilence
      Cleveland calamities : a history of storm, fire and pestilence
      Alan Dutka.
      "Stories of Cleveland's greatest blizzards, most destructive tornadoes, nastiest snow storms, worst floods and many more of the city's calamities"-- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Chicago's greatest year, 1893 : the White City and the birth of a modern metropolis
    • The rise of Chicago's Black metropolis, 1920-1929
    • Buffalo Bill on the silver screen : the films of William F. Cody
      Buffalo Bill on the silver screen : the films of William F. Cody
      Sandra K. Sagala.
      For more than thirty years, William F. "Buffalo Bill" Cody entertained audiences across the United States and Europe with his Wild West show. Scores of books have been written about Cody's fabled career as a showman, but his involvement in the film industry - following the dissolution of his traveling show - is less well known. In this book, Sandra K. Sagala chronicles the fascinating story of Cody's venture into filmmaking during the early cinema period. In 1894 Thomas Edison invited Cody to bring some of the Wild West performers to the inventor's kinetoscope studio. From then on, as Sagala reveals, Cody was frequently in the camera's eye, eager to participate in the newest and most popular phenomenon of the era: the motion picture. In 1910, promoter Pliny Craft produced 'The Life of Buffalo Bill', a film in which Cody played his own persona.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Route 66 : a road to America's landscape, history, and culture
      Route 66 : a road to America's landscape, history, and culture
      Markku Henriksson
      "Offers insight into America as revealed through the author's perspective on the peoples, histories, cultures, literature, and music of US Route 66"-- Provided by publisher.
      View details »
      Place a hold »
    • Unreal city : Las Vegas, Black Mesa, and the fate of the West