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    By adawson on

     Albert Ayler – Jazz Artist by Bill Anderson, 2008)

    Albert Ayler expanded the expressive possibilities of jazz saxophone and helped to develop the free jazz of the 1960s. Born in Cleveland, he carried his music first to Europe and then to New York City bringing the ecstasy of gospel music into jazz. He worked with Cecil Taylor, Don Cherry, and Sonny Rollins; his own groups included his brother Donald, Gary Peacock, Sunny Murray, Charles Tyler, and Ronald Shannon Jackson. He influenced his contemporaries like Rollins, John Coltrane, Eric Dolphy, and Pharoah Sanders, and is an influence today on younger...

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    By adawson on

    Founded in 1987 by Wilhelmina Cole Holladay, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, seeks to highlight the work of women artists in all media and to educate the public about their achievements. By bringing to light remarkable women artists of the past while also promoting the best women artists working today, the museum addresses the gender imbalance in the presentation of art in the U.S. and abroad, thus assuring great women artists a place of honor now and into the future. Located in the heart of Washington, D.C., the museum is the only museum in the world dedicated exclusively to recognizing...

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    By adawson on

     The Drawing Center is the only fine arts institution in the U.S. to focus solely on the exhibition of drawings, both historical andcontemporary. It was established in 1977 by curator Martha Beck (1938-2014) to provide opportunities for emerging artists, to demonstrate the diversity of drawings throughout history; and to stimulate public dialogue on issues of art and culture. Watch for a special event this year in the Fine Arts Department exhibiting Cleveland artist Corrie Slawson....

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    By adawson on

     12 Years A Slave        

    12 Years a Slave is known as the best historical documentation of slavery in the deep south of Louisianna on the Red River. It was written by Solomon Northup, a man who was born free and taken from his wife and three children to be sold into slavery. This story tells of the hardships he endured during his time as a slave until his rescue in 1853. The book was published the same year he was freed, and was recently made into a movie by Steve McQueen in 2013. A first edition copy of the book will be available for viewing at the Cleveland Public Main Library in Spring 2014.

    Porgy and Bess

    Set in the poor fishing...

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    By adawson on

         As a devoted surgeon, professor, inventor and medical researcher, George W. Crile (1864-1943), one of four founding members of the Cleveland Clinic, is a local hero whose accomplishments are known and recognized throughout the world. Crile’s research and achievements helped many people throughout his life, and even after his death.





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    By adawson on

    We Three Kings
    We three kings of orient are,
    Bearing gifts we traverse afar
    Field and fountain,
    Moor and mountain,
    Following yonder star.

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    By adawson on

    On Tuesday, November 26, 2013 one of only eleven existing copies of The whole booke of Psalmes faithfully translated into English metre, commonly referred to simply as the Bay Psalms Book was auctioned off at Sotheby’s Auction House in New York City. The Bay Psalm book is truly special because it was the first book published in America. The work was done by the Puritans in Cambridge, Massachusetts in the year 1640.

    The Puritans followed a strict lifestyle that valued education because it allowed them to study their religion and follow laws. The Puritans found many flaws in the translations from Hebrew to English of the book of psalms done by the Church of England so...

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    By adawson on

    Rock legend Lou Reed died October 27th, 2013 at the age of 71.To pigeonhhole his musical style is difficult, as Reed was subject to artistic reinvention during his near 50 year career. During his career, Lou Reed appeared many times in the Cleveland. In 1974, Billy Bass of RCA records said, "Lou loves Cleveland. That's where he broke out in the first place."

    Reed, along with classically trained musician John Cale, formed the proto-punk band the Velvet Underground. Under the  management of Andy Warhol the Underground recorded such classic songs as "Sweet Jane" and "Heroin". The 1967  Velvet Underground and Nico is...

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    By adawson on

    Thursday, September 12th is the 78th annual Anisfield-Wolf Book Award ceremony. The winners of the this year's prestigious international literary award are Kind One (Fiction) by Laird Hunt, The Yellow Birds (Fiction) by Kevin Powers, My Favorite Warlord (Poetry) by Eugene Gloria, Far From the Tree (Nonfiction) by Andrew Solomon and the Lifetime Achievement award goes to Wole Soyinka.

    The Anisfield-Wolf Book Awards recognizes books that examine and address issues of racism and have an impact on expanding our cultural awareness and appreciation for diversity.  The Cleveland Public Library's...

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    By Michael Dalby on

    GryphonDespite the myriad of spellings of its name, Gryphons simply translates from the Persian to mean lion eagle. The name suits this mythical creature because it has the strength of both animals. Physically they are to be a hybrid of the two. Gryphons have the upper body of an eagle and the lower body of a lion. A massive forceful looking animal, a Gryphon is said to stand about 2 feet higher than a horse.  

     

     The Persians, Greeks and Egyptian were just a few of the cultures of the known ancient world that had myths about Gryphons.  All these cultures represented the gryphon on their artifacts. While in their mythologies the Gryphon’s...

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