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    By adawson on

    Orientalism, the interest in all things Asian and Eastern, was a popular subject of fascination and wonder during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and consequently was a popular field for collectors. John G. White, the founding donor of the library’s Special Collections, was an avid collector of foreign and international books, including orientalia. Amongst the White collections, the Cleveland Public Library has many copies of the 1001 Arabian Nights, along with a truly special collection of the first photographs of the Islamic holy city of Mecca.

    Picture 034 Picture 036...

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    By adawson on

    MusicarnivalMusicarnival was a tent theatre company that operated in Cleveland from 1954 to 1975, with a winter session in West Palm Beach, Florida from 1958. During the course of its career, the Musicarnival theatre company earned national respect for its professionalism and devotion to quality as a producer of Broadway shows and musicals, Operettas, and as a host for big name musical and entertainment acts.

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    By Michael Dalby on

    Jane Scott

    On July 4th, 2011, renowned Cleveland Plain Dealer rock critic Jane Scott passed away at age 92. Read the following remembrances and then check out some books in the Fine Arts Department about Rock in Cleveland.

    Cleveland.com article

    NY Times article

    LA Times article 

     

    Jane Sc ott with Frankie Vallie and The Who

    BOOKS IN FINE ARTS

    Adams, Deanna...

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    By Michael Dalby on

    BACKSTORY: Significance of June 25th

    The most famous action of the Black Hills or the Great Sioux War of 1876-1877, the Battle of the Little Big Horn (aka Battle of the Greasy Grass) was fought on the 25th and 26th of June, 1876, near present day Crow Agency, Montana. The battle was waged between 5,000 Arapahoe, Lakota and Northern Cheyenne warriors (under the leadership of Chiefs Crazy Horse, Gall and Sitting Bull) and the 700 men of the US Seventh Calvary (commanded by Civil War veteran Lt. Colonel George Armstrong Custer). By dusk of the 26th, 268 US Soldiers--five companies of men as well as Custer himself, two of his own brothers, a nephew and a brother-in-law--lay dead in the tall grass.

    BIBLIOGRAPHY

    Michelle Black's An Uncommon Enemy. New York: Forge, 2001.

    ...

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    By Michael Dalby on

    On July 11, 1804, Former Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton was mortally wounded in a pistol duel with Vice President Aaron Burr.

    It was the New York governor's race of 1804 that pushed these two rivals to violence. In that election, candidate Aaron Burr turned his back on the Republican party and ran as an independent. The prospect of Burr leading New York so mortified Hamilton (a Federalist who despised and mistrusted Burr as “a man of irregular and insatiable ambition”) that he tried to convince New York Federalists not to support Burr. At the polls, Burr would be crushingly defeated. Shortly therafter, a letter was published in a leading newspaper of the day that had been written by an attendee of a dinner party that had also included Hamilton. The forceful comdemnations that the former Treasury Secretary had made against Burr within that small intimate gathering had now become the talk of the town. Outraged, Burr subsequently challenged his rival to a duel that was accepted.

    ...

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    By Michael Dalby on

    Battle of Gettysburg: July 1-3, 1863            

      With an eye to stiking terror within ordinary civilians in the Union heartland; to shift the focus of the summer campaign of 1863 from war-ravaged Virginia to the North, and by defeating a Union army on its home ground, CSA General Robert Edward Lee led an army 71, 699 strong into Adams County, Pennsylvania. Between the first and 3rd of July, 1863, Lee’s army clashed with the 93,921 strong Army of the Potomac under the command of Union General George G. Meade. The battle, encompassing the city of Gettysburg, would end in a Union victory so costly—the two armies suffered between 46,000 and 51,000 casualties—that Lee would not invade the North again. Yet, Lee’s army had escaped total destruction and retreated to relative safety. As President...

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    By adawson on

    Cleveland Public Library and the Agora Theater host the American Checker Federation and World Checker & Draughts Federation's Picture 023(WCDF) World Checker Tournament.

    On August 17, 19, & 20, the Cleveland Public Library will host the  3-move world title match of checkers between Alex Moiseyev (Dublin, Ohio) and challenger Michele Borghetti (Italy).

    August 17 10:00 a.m. - 6 p.m. - Main Library, 3rd Floor, Treasure Room August 19 - 20 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. - Main Library, Louis Stokes Wing Auditorium

    ...

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