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    By adawson on

     If you’re coming downtown to the St. Patrick’s Day parade, The Special Collections Department of the Cleveland Public Library invites you to stop in and see a copy of The Book of Ballymote.

     In pre-Christian Ireland there had been some form of written literature being created. In addition to writing manuscripts, they were also preserving them.   In the 4th century, Ethicus of Istria wrote in his book “Topography” that he had seen some of these works. When St. Patrick arrived in Ireland he also encountered writers amongst the Druids and poets. Manuscripts were kept in religious houses or in the residence of scholars.  From the 5th to 9th century AD, Ireland was considered  an oasis...

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    By adawson on

     On April 28, 1865, two weeks after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, his funeral train made a 1,700 mile trek to the late President’s final resting place in Springfield, Illinois. One of the train’s several stops was in Cleveland, Ohio where thousands lined up to pay homage to the fallen President. It was four years early, President-elect Lincoln made his only other stop in Cleveland on his way to Washington D.C.  From the balcony of the Weddell House, a hotel at the corner of Superior and Bank (now E.6th) Lincoln addressed the citizens, encouraging them to support the Union. 

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    By adawson on

    The Cleveland Heights and Shaker Heights neighborhoods, on the east side of Cleveland, are home to many architecturally unique and significant residences.  Many of these homes were designed by the Howell & Thomas Architectural Firm in the 1910s and 1920s.  Carl Eugen Howell and James William Thomas first came to Cleveland to design homes for the B.R. Deming Company’s Euclid Golf Allotment in Cleveland Heights. Originally, the Euclid Golf Allotment was Ohio’s first professionally-designed 18-hole golf course and was owned by John D. Rockefeller, Sr.  It was decided that the course was too small and by 1913 the B.R. Deming Company reached an agreement with Rockefeller to purchase the land and turn the area into high quality residences. 



     

    ...

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    By adawson on

     No holiday season is complete without holly, mistletoe and poinsettia.In fact it seems as if Halloween is has not quite come and gone yet before these festive plants are put out on display. Indeed these holiday plants have some very old traditions that associate them with the holidays.  This blog explores some of the folkloric traditions behind the use of them.

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    By adawson on

    This past May, Cleveland celebrated its long history of performing arts by adding the world’s first outdoor chandelier to the play district on Euclid Avenue. This is a beginning to transform the PlayhouseSquare into a dynamic neighborhood. The roots of this theater pride can be seen in the CPL’s Literature Departments Theater and Entertainment Scrapbook collections. These books contain countless numbers of theater programs, play reviews, images of actors, and other ephemera showing us what the nightlife was like 100 years ago.

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    By adawson on

           The best-known blues song and most recorded song of the pre-rock era,  September 11, 2014 marked the 100th anniversary of  the publication of W.C.Handy's iconic "St. Louis Blues". 

     William Christopher Handy was born  the son of a Methodist minister in Alabama onNovember 16, 1873. He began studying music at a young age despite his father’s objections. The man who became known as “Father of the Blues” began as his musical career playing cornet in a brass band that specialized in marches, spirituals and light classical music.  It was while traveling the South in the early 1900’s; Handy developed an interest and appreciation for blues.... 



    ...

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    By adawson on

    Join in the fun ! AHA! Cleveland, winner of Cuyahoga Arts & Culture's 2013 Creative Culture Grants, is a multi-day festival of lights celebrating Cleveland's recent downtown development boom and will "illuminate" changes to our urban landscape. AHA! will bring people together from across the region to demonstrate what is possible in our beloved downtown public spaces through artist installations using light and video projections. Featured artists include Yvette Mattern, Obscura Digital, Jen Lewin, and Iván Juárez. In addition to these installations, each night will include public...

    Read More »

    By adawson on

    WatsonOne does not need to be a Chess Champion, a Chess Researcher or a Chess Historian to be touched by the greatness of the John G. White Chess Collection, at the Cleveland Public Library.  The enchanting displays of chess, checkers and chess boards can literally transport one through time. 

     John G. White was a prominent Cleveland attorney who donated an impressive collection of Chess, Checkers, Folklores, and Orientalia to the Cleveland Public Library at the...

    Read More »

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    By adawson on

     If you’re coming downtown to the St. Patrick’s Day parade, The Special Collections Department of the Cleveland Public Library invites you to stop in and see a copy of The Book of Ballymote.

     In pre-Christian Ireland there had been some form of written literature being created. In addition to writing manuscripts, they were also preserving them.   In the 4th century, Ethicus of Istria wrote in his book “Topography” that he had seen some of these works. When St. Patrick arrived in Ireland he also encountered writers amongst the Druids and poets. Manuscripts were kept in religious houses or in the residence of scholars.  From the 5th to 9th century AD, Ireland was considered  an oasis...

    Read More »

    By adawson on

     On April 28, 1865, two weeks after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, his funeral train made a 1,700 mile trek to the late President’s final resting place in Springfield, Illinois. One of the train’s several stops was in Cleveland, Ohio where thousands lined up to pay homage to the fallen President. It was four years early, President-elect Lincoln made his only other stop in Cleveland on his way to Washington D.C.  From the balcony of the Weddell House, a hotel at the corner of Superior and Bank (now E.6th) Lincoln addressed the citizens, encouraging them to support the Union. 

    Read More »

    By adawson on

    The Cleveland Heights and Shaker Heights neighborhoods, on the east side of Cleveland, are home to many architecturally unique and significant residences.  Many of these homes were designed by the Howell & Thomas Architectural Firm in the 1910s and 1920s.  Carl Eugen Howell and James William Thomas first came to Cleveland to design homes for the B.R. Deming Company’s Euclid Golf Allotment in Cleveland Heights. Originally, the Euclid Golf Allotment was Ohio’s first professionally-designed 18-hole golf course and was owned by John D. Rockefeller, Sr.  It was decided that the course was too small and by 1913 the B.R. Deming Company reached an agreement with Rockefeller to purchase the land and turn the area into high quality residences. 



     

    ...

    Read More »

    By adawson on

     No holiday season is complete without holly, mistletoe and poinsettia.In fact it seems as if Halloween is has not quite come and gone yet before these festive plants are put out on display. Indeed these holiday plants have some very old traditions that associate them with the holidays.  This blog explores some of the folkloric traditions behind the use of them.

    Read More »

    By adawson on

    This past May, Cleveland celebrated its long history of performing arts by adding the world’s first outdoor chandelier to the play district on Euclid Avenue. This is a beginning to transform the PlayhouseSquare into a dynamic neighborhood. The roots of this theater pride can be seen in the CPL’s Literature Departments Theater and Entertainment Scrapbook collections. These books contain countless numbers of theater programs, play reviews, images of actors, and other ephemera showing us what the nightlife was like 100 years ago.

    Read More »

    By adawson on

           The best-known blues song and most recorded song of the pre-rock era,  September 11, 2014 marked the 100th anniversary of  the publication of W.C.Handy's iconic "St. Louis Blues". 

     William Christopher Handy was born  the son of a Methodist minister in Alabama onNovember 16, 1873. He began studying music at a young age despite his father’s objections. The man who became known as “Father of the Blues” began as his musical career playing cornet in a brass band that specialized in marches, spirituals and light classical music.  It was while traveling the South in the early 1900’s; Handy developed an interest and appreciation for blues.... 



    ...

    Read More »

    By adawson on

    Join in the fun ! AHA! Cleveland, winner of Cuyahoga Arts & Culture's 2013 Creative Culture Grants, is a multi-day festival of lights celebrating Cleveland's recent downtown development boom and will "illuminate" changes to our urban landscape. AHA! will bring people together from across the region to demonstrate what is possible in our beloved downtown public spaces through artist installations using light and video projections. Featured artists include Yvette Mattern, Obscura Digital, Jen Lewin, and Iván Juárez. In addition to these installations, each night will include public...

    Read More »

    By adawson on

    WatsonOne does not need to be a Chess Champion, a Chess Researcher or a Chess Historian to be touched by the greatness of the John G. White Chess Collection, at the Cleveland Public Library.  The enchanting displays of chess, checkers and chess boards can literally transport one through time. 

     John G. White was a prominent Cleveland attorney who donated an impressive collection of Chess, Checkers, Folklores, and Orientalia to the Cleveland Public Library at the...

    Read More »

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